The importance of developmental and sensory screenings for young children

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

COPPER CORRIDOR (June 18, 2021) – As Arizona’s early childhood agency, First Things First (FTF) recognizes that while every child develops at their own pace, developmental and sensory screenings are a way parents can learn about their child’s development.

  Screenings can also catch concerns that can point to a delay or possible disability.

  “Screenings are important because they identify delays and allow parents to connect with support services,” said FTF Senior Director for Children’s Health Vincent Torres. “They promote positive childhood health and development and readiness for school.”

  The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that pediatricians talk with families about their child’s development at every well-child visit between birth and 3 years old, and conduct developmental screenings at 9, 18 and 30 months of age.

  Since the COVID-19 pandemic, many families put off well-child visits for their young child, Torres said, causing these regular screenings to have been missed.

  But another problem arises if a health provider is understaffed and doesn’t have time to conduct the basic screenings that parents assume are happening, said Esther Turner, a senior program coordinator for the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension, Pinal County, which provides developmental and sensory screenings.

  Data shows that for many children, even before the pandemic, those screenings were not happening. For example, the 2018-19 National Survey of Children’s Health found that only 28% of Arizona parents surveyed said that they were asked by a health care provider to complete a developmental screening tool about their young child in the past year.

  Programs like the Cooperative Extension try to fill the gap by offering screenings conducted by staff working with a variety of parenting education or family support services in the community. They also do screenings in some preschool classrooms.

  “Kids don’t know any better and they can’t tell you what they don’t know,” said Turner, whose FTF-funded program provides developmental and sensory screenings for young children in Pinal and Gila counties. “They only know what they’ve seen or heard their entire life.”

  In addition, there’s a fear or stigma for parents when talking about developmental screenings.

  “We’re not looking for problems,” Turner said. “Instead, we explain to parents that we’re looking to show you ‘this is normal development. Your kiddo is right now, on target.’”

  And if the screening shows an area or concern, then the parent is referred to the child’s pediatrician for additional screenings or intervention.

  “We want parents to be comfortable and let them know that they are the expert on their child,” Turner said. “The parent sees the child throughout the day. They are the expert and by letting them be a part of the process, they feel active in their child’s development and growth.”

  If you are a parent or caregiver of a child 5 years old and younger, you can make a difference by monitoring your child’s physical, mental, social and emotional development and discussing your observations with your health care provider.

  Please remember that all children develop at different rates. What is typical for other children may not be the same for yours. There are a couple of resources to help parents and caregivers identify concerns regarding their child’s development and make the most of those early doctor visits.

  The first is the Ages and Stages Questionnaire, which parents can complete online. It includes a series of questions regarding your child’s development and behavior. The results of the questionnaire are emailed to parents within a couple of weeks and are intended to be used to follow up with a health provider regarding any identified issues. Free access to the questionnaire is available through Easterseals, Make the First Five Count website, http://www.easterseals.com/mtffc/ under Take the Screening.

  FTF provides a digital Ages and Stages guide to help families know if their child is meeting typical developmental milestones — the things most children can do by a certain age. How their child plays, learns, speaks, acts and moves offers important clues. Available in both English and Spanish, it is adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Ages and Stages guides.

  Another resource is the free, statewide Birth to 5 Helpline (1-877-705-5437). There, nurses and developmental experts will give you tips on which milestones your child should have achieved for their age and help you decide if a follow up with your health provider is needed.

  “We have the chance to help children learn properly and not having them have to relearn once they’re in kindergarten,” Turner said. “These are things that people think can wait until kindergarten, but we have five good years. Let’s get it right for them from the beginning.”

  To learn more about sensory and developmental screenings offered by U of A Cooperative Extension in Pinal, or to make an appointment, call 520-836-4651 or email wecare@cals.arizona.edu

About First Things First

As Arizona’s early childhood agency, First Things First funds early learning, family support and children’s preventive health services to help kids be successful once they enter kindergarten. Decisions about how those funds are spent are made by local councils staffed by community volunteers. To learn more, visit FirstThingsFirst.org.

As Arizona’s early childhood agency, First Things First reminds families that developmental and sensory screenings for their young children help identify delays and help connect parents with support services. 

admin (7754 Posts)


Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather
Facebooktwitterby feather

Comments are closed.

  • Additional Stories

    Cy Miller

    July 21st, 2021
    by

    Cy Miller was born July 1, 1937 at Baylor Hospital in Dallas, Texas to Cyrus and Alice Miller. Cy had […]


    Meet the President: Kennedy Ivy heads up San Manuel Revitalization Coaltion

    July 21st, 2021
    by

    By Nathaniel A. Lopez San Manuel Miner   On July 18, the Miner caught up with the president of the […]


    Amelia Gonzales

    July 21st, 2021
    by

    Amelia Gonzales, 85, loved being called Mom by her children and Nana by her grandchildren. She departed to the gates […]


    Oracle Community Learning Garden

    July 21st, 2021
    by

    June 20,2021 Mulch Matters Mulching is one of the simplest and most beneficial practices you can use in your garden. […]


  • Additional Stories

    Mayor’s Minute: Catching up on all things Superior!

    July 21st, 2021
    by

    What a busy year 2021 has been – it is hard to believe that half of the year has passed!  […]


    Superior Library to close for vacation; to reopen Aug. 2

    July 21st, 2021
    by

      The Superior Public Library will be closed July 26 through July 30 to accommodate staff vacations.   The library […]


    Superior students heading back to class on Aug. 4

    July 21st, 2021
    by

      The Superior Unified School District (SUSD) has adopted a four-day school week for the  2021/2022 Academic Year which begins […]


    Sea Lions win against Globe in home swim meet

    July 21st, 2021
    by

      The Sea Lions hosted the Globe Piranhas on Saturday, July 17, at the Mammoth Pool.  The Sea Lions won […]


  • Copperarea

  • Southeast Valley Ledger