Self Healing: ‘Fat-free’

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John Huntington

Special to the Pinal Nugget

I was stopped in my tracks when I saw the words “Fat-free” blazoned in red on the label of a 5 lb. bag of sugar at the market.

After my well-deserve double-take (of course there is no fat in sugar – you just GET fat consuming too much!), I realized I was witnessing a sales pitch that further fueled the lie about why we gain weight, lose energy and gradually slide toward the many chronic diseases troubling modern society.

A recent study confirms the damage sugar has to our health. This study looked at the effect of added sugars only, not those naturally present in the diet. The study showed increased risk of death from heart disease (CVD).

“Most US adults consume more added sugar than is recommended for a healthy diet. We observed a significant relationship between added sugar consumption and increased risk for CVD mortality.”

And it isn’t only heart disease that is advanced with excess sugars, but also our other scourge, cancer.

Reducing sugar intake is not a fun thing to consider. We have an in-born drive to consume it.

All through time man has selected and developed plants with a higher starch (sugar) level. This is easy to see when you by compare a modern ear of corn to an older, heritage breed. The older varieties are smaller and tougher – yet don’t raise blood sugar near as much as modern varieties.

The best starting point for reducing sugar is to eliminate processed foods (anything in a box, can, wrapper, etc.) of all kinds. They are loaded with sugar both to add flavor and to act as a preservative.

Happily, once your sugar intake drops, you will experience less instability to blood sugar and your cravings can be lessened. And, as most grains (and especially common wheat) are rapidly turned to sugar in the body, dropping breads and flours can result in even greater ease with this health benefiting change.

Dr. Huntington practices Chiropractic, Biomedical Acupuncture and Physiotherapy in Oracle, Az. 520-896-9844 huntingtonchiro@hotmail.com.

John Huntington (21 Posts)

John Huntington is a local business owner in Oracle. He is a chiropractor with many years in the community. He writes a health related article in Pinal Nugget.


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